Thursday, October 9, 2008

Can't Let Go

On Wednesday, my adviser at the office of career management advises that I remove all traces of my high school career from my resume. And I see this coming really. "You're a sophomore now, you can let these things go." But can I? As it is, high school is still the crowning achievement of my downward spiraling life. I used to tell people, "I go to _____ High School," and I immediately commanded their respect. I felt smart and special and that I was worth their time. Remember that lame NBC show American Dreams? I won that essay contest in high school. They gave me a lifetime supply of tomato soup (since it was sponsored by Campbell's). I don't think I'm going to top that anytime soon.

Now, I tell people I go to University of ________, and they wonder what went wrong with me. In the back of their minds, I'm sure they are comparing me to Jodie Sweetin or Tiffany or some other child star that fell through the cracks. So while I stew in my bitterness at this mediocre school doing mediocre things, I still desperately want people to know that I was once somebody better. I was once the best at something. And I will be damned if I have to let that go.

8 comments:

DL said...

Wow that's awesome you won that contest for American Dreams - what does a lifetime supply really mean? I've always wondered that...

Joshua said...

Woah a lifetime supply of tomato soup?? That's totally something to be proud of!

And you should be proud of any university! You should be proud of yourself! The school you go to tells nothing about you except that you want to learn!

The Blackout Blog said...

Yeah, my achievements with the most wow factor were from high school, too. Your best bet is to get internships/jobs that are related to what you want to do so that you don't have to put so much from high school on your resume.

But I say if it's remarkable, leave it on there. *looks around cubicle* I do.

sean said...

I'm surprised your advisor told you to take your high school achievements off your resume. Don't listen to them. Any experience or awards or anything important in your past is still relevant to show on your resume.

Andrew said...

I think Sean's right. I know when I've been applying for internships lately that they still ask about that stuff.

As for University, I think Joshua's right. Doesn't really matter in the end as long as you're learning something and trying to do something with your life.

Mike said...

If you are a sophomore in college and don't include your high school achievements, what else are you going to include on your resume? A blank piece of paper with your name, address and email at the top might get you a job in the Treasury department these days, but not many other places.

As for the college/university, unfortunately yes it makes a HUGE difference in the short-run, especially in regards to the friends you make at college/university, and the influence they have on you. Also your career choices will be limited by those whom recruit at your college/university.

However, if you go to a mediocre undergrad and then go to a great grad, then all sins of the undergrad are forgiven.

Similarly, if you have a career passion, or are very focused, then undergrad in the LONG RUN doesn't mean much, but of course, learn the flute and enter every beauty pageant applicable.

Lastly, is there anyway you can exchange the tomato for say chunky clam chowder? In my humble opinion, the essay would have more meaning.

j said...

dl: i don't know, i never finished the first case...

joshua: tell that to the asians.

blackout: i'll probably engrave it onto my tombstone.

sean: in that case, i'm putting my 5th grade citizenship award back on.

andrew: unfortunately, i am doing neither of those things currently.

mike: that is assuming i can get into a great grad / am focused / am beautiful.

Dan said...

You could stockpile all the soup you get in preparation for the zombie apocalypse. Or you could sell them for 10 cents per can and save the change until you save up enough for a trip!